Kubernetes

Kubernetes 1.5.0 was released just about a month ago! Key theme for the release are:

Read CHANGELOG for complete details. Up until 1.5.0, starting up a Kubernetes cluster on Amazon Web Services was pretty straight forward.

But with 1.5.0 and 1.5.1, the command fails with the error:

What happened? Basically, Kubernetes binaries was getting bigger than 1GB. The binary was broken into a basic install bundle and client and server binaries. The updated installation process requires to download the basic install bundle of of 4.57 MB (yes, MB instead of GB). It includes cluster scripts like kubectl, kube-up.sh and kube-down.sh, examples, docs and other scripts. This then downloads client and server binaries. Server binary is the base image that is used to start EC2 instances. But instead of automating the download of binaries, somebody decided to add a README in the server directory.

This was a big user experience change, and no links in the README bundled with the release or the release blog. Ouch!

Anyway, this was filed as #38728 and fixed promptly. But it missed the 1.5.1 release and now finally showed up in the 1.5.2 release today.

So, how do you run a Kubernetes 1.5.2 cluster on AWS? It is more seamlessly integrated now but you need to hit Enter key a couple of times to accept the default value:

After the usual Kubernetes cluster is created, the output is shown as:

Even though your Kubernetes cluster on AWS starts up fine, but kube-up.sh script is going to be deprecated soon. The recommended way is to use Kubernetes Cluster on Amazon using Kops. Now that your Kubernetes cluster is up, what do you do next?  

 

Posted by Arun Gupta, VP, Developer Advocacy, Couchbase

Arun Gupta is the vice president of developer advocacy at Couchbase. He has built and led developer communities for 10+ years at Sun, Oracle, and Red Hat. He has deep expertise in leading cross-functional teams to develop and execute strategy, planning and execution of content, marketing campaigns, and programs. Prior to that he led engineering teams at Sun and is a founding member of the Java EE team. Gupta has authored more than 2,000 blog posts on technology. He has extensive speaking experience in more than 40 countries on myriad topics and is a JavaOne Rock Star for three years in a row. Gupta also founded the Devoxx4Kids chapter in the US and continues to promote technology education among children. An author of several books on technology, an avid runner, a globe trotter, a Java Champion, a JUG leader, NetBeans Dream Team member, and a Docker Captain, he is easily accessible at @arungupta.

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