James Phillips's blog

April 19, 2010

Elastic Data and the Cloud

(Also see video blog)
Today we announced a very exciting relationship with Heroku: Heroku’s Memcached Add-On is powered by NorthScale Memcached Server and NorthScale is operating the add-on service on Heroku’s behalf. For those who haven’t checked out Heroku, they are the leading Ruby on Rails Platform as a Service (PaaS) cloud service provider, with over 55,000 applications running on their platform. In just a few weeks since opening the add-on for public beta, we’ve added over 300 new companies to the NorthScale Memcached Server customer roster; with adoption accelerating.  This week the NorthScale add-on is generally available from Heroku with pricing announced by Heroku today.

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March 25, 2010

When it comes to database technology, NorthScale is pro-choice

On Monday, analyst Matt Aslett posted How will pro-SQL respond to NoSQL? on The 451 Group’s “Too Much Information” blog. Good read. The gist of the post was: There are a bunch of individuals and companies running around claiming that their particular flavor of SQL database technology, memcached, or “NoSQL” database technology is “best.” The title implies that there is a “pro-SQL” camp and a NoSQL camp at odds with each other, battling for some prize. He concludes very practically: This should not be an “us versus them” kind of thing. We couldn’t agree more. NorthScale is neither pro-SQL nor NoSQL, we’re pro-choice.

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March 16, 2010

Hello, World.

After many months of hard work running up to our launch, writing this blog entry is the very last item on my pre-launch to-do list. We just walked out of our “go/no-go” meeting on the software and we’re ready to roll. It’s hard to believe we’re finally here.

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October 23, 2009

Third Stage (and not the repeatedly-delayed album from Boston)

As a nerdy adolescent boy growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana I discovered that I really loved computers – and computer software in particular. Creating something from nothing and instantly seeing the results in all their black-and-green, 64 column-by-16 line, ASCII-character glory gave me a level of satisfaction very few other things did.

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