I was very excited about the Windows 10 Anniversary Update (AU), mainly because of the new Bash on Ubuntu on Windows stuff! My experience has been generally positive, but with any major upgrade comes risk. I ran into a couple of problems. One of them was with some missing DLL files, not related to Couchbase Server. But the other one is related to Couchbase Server. Short story: we’re aware, and we’re working on it.

Windows 10 Anniversary Update

Longer Story

Couchbase Server uses a tool called TCMalloc, which is part of gperftools (originally called Google Performance Tools).

Based on my limited understanding of low-level programming, somewhere in TCMalloc, there is some code being called that’s not technically part of the public interface.

Windows 10 Anniversary Update comes along, and suddenly that piece of code doesn’t work like it’s supposed to anymore. This causes the memcached portion of Couchbase to crash over and over. Whoops. Couchbase engineers are hard at work on this issue, and I would expect this to be fixed soon.

If you’re interested in tracking this issue more, here are some places to go for more information:

Recommendations

In the meantime, if you are using Couchbase Server on Windows 10, here are some recommendations:

  • Hold off on upgrading to AU
  • Or use a VM or Windows Azure instance to develop
  • Or use another machine on your local network (this is what I’m doing)
  • Or it may be possible to back off of the AU update.

And keep an eye on MB-20519 to watch the progess.

Follow me on Twitter if you’d like to keep in the loop on the latest with Couchbase, .NET, and Windows!

Author

Posted by Matthew Groves

Matthew D. Groves is a guy who loves to code. It doesn't matter if it's C#, jQuery, or PHP: he'll submit pull requests for anything. He has been coding professionally ever since he wrote a QuickBASIC point-of-sale app for his parent's pizza shop back in the 90s. He currently works as a Product Marketing Manager for Couchbase. His free time is spent with his family, watching the Reds, and getting involved in the developer community. He is the author of AOP in .NET (published by Manning), a Pluralsight author, and a Microsoft MVP.

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