Blogs

October 12, 2010

Building membase from the sources...

I thought I should share some information about my personal development model for membase.

I've set up a "sandbox" where I'm doing all of my development in with the following commands:

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October 12, 2010

Membase and Cloudera Integration

Today is an exciting day for Membase. A number of us are attending Hadoop World 2010 in New York City, and if the event reception tonight is any indication of things to come tomorrow, it is going to be an event I’d have hated to miss. A very smart crowd of data scientists on the leading edge of applying Hadoop, and Membase, to solve some extremely interesting, and diverse, application and data management problems.

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October 11, 2010

Membase Server is Now Generally Available!

I am proud to say we have just released Membase Server 1.6 for general availability. We owe a huge debt of gratitude to our hundreds of beta users, who have worked with us over the past few months providing excellent feedback and helping us drive the product forward. Thank you!
 
Here are some of the things that stand out to me as we release the product to market:
 

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October 8, 2010

Writing your own storage engine for Memcached, part 2

In the previous blog post I described the engine initialization and destruction. This blog post will cover the memory allocation model in the engine interface.

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October 5, 2010

A Great Day for Membase

Whenever I talk about Membase with candidates, employees, or friends, I feel more and more excited about what we are building and how it is going to impact the industry. Each discussion validates my belief that what we do *is* unique and a game changer. Just today, we had two important “wins,” one from a prospect who evaluated our technology against other NoSQL databases and chose Membase. I can’t talk much about it yet, but this is an amazing win. The second is the fact that IDC chose us as an innovative company to watch. Great day!

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October 4, 2010

Writing Your Own Storage Engine for Memcached

I am working full time on membase, which utilize the "engine interface" we're adding to Memcached. Being the one who designed the API and wrote the documentation, I can say that we do need more (and better) documentation without insulting anyone.

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October 4, 2010

Membase Recognized by IDC

Winning awards is always fun. Over the years, companies I’ve been part of have won their fair share. But not all awards are created equal. Some definitely carry more weight than others, and I put the IDC Innovative Company to Watch award in this category. The fact that IDC does extensive research on the markets they address, talks regularly to a broad set of vendors and customers, and has a rigorous process for award selection all brings great credibility to the award. The award certainly has great meaning for us and I suspect this is also true for organizations who are thinking through what database to use for their next project. As a small company it’s always a challenge to get the word out about your products and this is particularly true when you’re in a space like NoSQL where there are lots of competing technologies. Membase wasn’t one of the first NoSQL products in the market, so it’s encouraging that our innovative work and early customer success is being recognized so quickly. We’re very proud that while IDC could have given the award to any of the many NoSQL contenders, they chose to give it to us.

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September 23, 2010

Membase Server Beta 4 is here, with memcached buckets!

We NorthScalers have been hard at work and are proud to release Membase Server Beta 4, our final Beta release ahead of our general availability release. Go and grab it here! In addition to support for 64-bit Windows, we think you'll be particularly excited by a major new feature in the release: memcached buckets! Introducing Memcached Buckets You now can create buckets in your Membase Server cluster that behave exactly like memcached, which means you can use Membase Server as a drop-in replacement for your existing memcached setup. In a single cluster you can now share the resources between memcached buckets and membase buckets. Let's look at the differences between memcached and membase bucket types:

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September 14, 2010

Membase and RightScale: Elastic Data Scaling in the Cloud

I am very excited that Membase ServerTemplates are now up and running on the RightScale Cloud Management Platform (see today’s announcement). RightScale customers now have easy access to a leading NoSQL database for the first time, and Membase customers can rest easy that when they’re ready to deploy their applications in the cloud they can take advantage of the leading cloud management platform in the industry. For those who may not be familiar with RightScale ServerTemplates, they’re really cool.

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September 3, 2010

Membase and Open Source 4.0

I read Matt Aslett's (The 451) post on the golden age of open source with interest. In it he describes that we've arrived at the fourth stage of open source, which is ”in short: a return to a focus on collaboration and community, as well as commercial interests."

What we're doing with membase.org definitely falls in line with this description although with a slightly different twist. NorthScale saw the need for a simple, fast, and elastic NoSQL database that we felt wasn’t being met by existing technologies. When it became clear that many prominent companies shared this view and were committed to an open source solution, NorthScale stepped in to shepherd the development of a broad community around the membase.org project. Consistent with Matt Aslett’s description of open source 4.0, the result is a project with an “emphasis on collaboration and community rather than control." While NorthScale has contributed the bulk of the code to the project, our customers Zynga and NHN are co-sponsors of the project who have a strong commitment to its success. This blurring of the line between vendor and customer – the collaboration between two seemingly opposite sides of a transaction – has long set open source apart from the large proprietary vendors who want nothing more than a lock on their customers.

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